Iron Age Food and an update from the project

Posted by on Oct 29, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments

On Thursday 9 November the archaeology team will be reporting back on their analysis of finds and conclusions so far. This will happen in Stoer Hall from 7.30pm. We’ll be serving some Iron Age style refreshments from 7pm onwards, so make sure not to eat too much beforehand or you’ll miss out on some archaeologically-informed […]

What we did and what we found out 

Posted by on Oct 19, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments

Join us at Stoer Hall on 9th and 10th November to find out more about the results of our work at Clachtoll, and to see the lovely finds. More details in the poster below! 

Our stonemason speaks

Posted by on Oct 4, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Our stonemason speaks

We thought you would be interested to hear from the broch builder himself. For regular readers, no, sadly this doesn’t mean we’ve managed to bring Ug back to life, but Brian Wilson, from Wildland Services in Ullapool, is the next best thing – the masterful stonemason who has been repairing some of the most dangerous […]

Only one week of excavation to go at Clachtoll broch

Posted by on Sep 23, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Only one week of excavation to go at Clachtoll broch

It’s hard to believe but the archaeological team will be at Clachtoll broch for just one more week. It’s also hard to believe the transformation to the building in that time. Almost the entire interior of the ruin has been revealed, with hundreds of tonnes of stone taken out and the floor removed right down […]

3D model of Clachtoll by James McComas

Posted by on Sep 22, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments

Clachtoll volunteer and NoSAS member James McComas has constructed this 3D model of the broch using photogrammetry… thanks James! Clachtoll Broch, Assynt Sep 2017 Late Excavation by jamesmcc on Sketchfab  

Dem bones, dem bones…

Posted by on Sep 19, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Dem bones, dem bones…

(Thanks to Jen Valentine for this post). Wednesday afternoon and Thursday last week saw the start of the specialist environmental aspect of the Broch excavation with some of the bone and deposit samples being looked at. AOC’s Environmental Archaeologist, Jack, started with a wet sieving session on Wednesday afternoon. On the bank of the burn […]

Wanted: Miniature Archaeologist!

Posted by on Sep 11, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Wanted: Miniature Archaeologist!

With every stone that is moved, the broch seems to become more dramatic, and now some of the intricate corners are now under investigation, including the guard chambers off the entrance passage. Excavating these calls for a really tiny archaeologist who likes dark, confined spaces, so if that’s you, do get in touch! Meanwhile we’ll […]

Piecing together 2000 years

Posted by on Sep 6, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Piecing together 2000 years

Today we put two and two together and made two thousand years. It  happened during a finds workshop in the village hall at Stoer, cataloguing some of the objects uncovered at Clachtoll broch over recent weeks. One of the volunteers was recording a pottery find. It consisted of three pieces of ceramic, two of which […]

Daily finds being made at Clachtoll broch

Posted by on Sep 4, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Daily finds being made at Clachtoll broch

Daily discoveries being made at Clachtoll Broch The following is a media release sent out on Monday 4 September 2017 A community archaeology project that is conserving and excavating the broch at Clachtoll, in Assynt, Sutherland, is now finding Iron Age artifacts on a daily basis. Hundreds of tonnes of rubble have been removed from […]

Shedding some light on Iron Age life

Posted by on Aug 25, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Shedding some light on Iron Age life

What’s the point of archaeology? Is it unravelling the mysteries of ancient trigonometric knowledge, such as on those marked in cuneiform on the clay tablets that have perplexed us for decades since they were first found? Or is it understanding what form a building would have taken, before it tumbled into a ruin of rubble? […]